DANIEL RCHANDLER GMC COMPLAINTS REPORTS -THEY LIKE HARRAING FEMAEL as usual-Even get special treatment to do so!! Reported to GMC, Glasgow University Courts, they prefer whites males,lecturers staff themselves seem to see it as some sort of duty to treat girls like objects to be scualy abused-usu whites sluts- then cause me probs w their scummy lives- dont think s! NOT my job to help THEIR whores lasses! eg Kisty:dumped by clacssics lecturer Gla-’98-then dont rub your probs on me, ask the medics who locked HER up,nothingt o do w me, dont want to be friends +used abused w their dumbo discards rejects who cant look after themselves then their parents take them away leaving me in pain, same w Mcintyres w gavin and I married 10 yrs- dont think these Nazis can wreck Our lives for that Rechy’s filthy moolah, trash allowed to incestuosly abuse MY husband secretly/ steal wgat she can lay her Disg. White paws on, to get away w crimes bc white?! whites scum always get pref treatment even primary school-aged 4, my friend moved school they got white in two yrs after we beall beenat school for staff treating me like dirt in favoutr of their dumb blonde thats how they make them rascist then NOT my job to chase their scum, nor hwlp their whores as Fran Watspnin RCP, then that disgusting Daniel and chandler harassed receiving special treatment for it, he total idiote chav at Glasgow!! GAVIN BEING MY lovely husband-not this time-am not four, close to 40 and ddont want to be targeted this december by kerb crawling plce scum, not chrstian not ill-(just bc that frans whores f buddy 10 aged 21whn she 16-dialegedly died on MY 17th bday ‘party’AT HER HOUSE- IHE IN IRELAND CAR ACCIDENT-PROB STONED KNOWING THM, NONE OF MY CONCERN,NENER MET HET HER PIMP-HE OUHHT TO PAY HER, DONT AKE MY MONEY IN rcp- THEN ABUSE ME YRS EVEN HER SCUMMY PARENTS THEY PAY FOR HER OK AND RETURNMY ND FAMILYS FUNDS AND LOCK THEIR STINKY WHORE OF A JUNKIE FAILURE KID DONT EXPECT ME TO CHASE WHAT IS MONE FROM HER MY MONEY FRIENDS LIFE THEN ABUSE ATTACK ME FOR IT CONTIOUS ABUSES BY THEIR STATE SINCE rECHY ALL WHIR=TES SAME STAEL WHAT IS MONE THEN ATTACK ME- TRY TO GET ME PHISYSIACCLY TO THEIR HOUSE TO ABUSE ME AND THREATEN W AUTHORITIE LIE FRAN, FRAN WAS 18-RECHY NR 80 TOIAL THEIVING WHORES ALL THEIR LIVES W THEUR SCUMMY THEIVING CHARLIES JUNKIES TO ‘PROTECT THEM’/ THEIR DISG says nazi PIGS+ NHS:ALL SECRETS DONT THINK SO! THEY WANT TO HE WHOLE WOT TO KNOW WHAT SCUMMY ARESELHELS THEY ARE- WOULD’T EVEMN LIKE TO GO DOWN TO THEIR LEVEL TO WRITE ABOUT THESE SCUMS-THEY READ SUM MIRROR MAIL, MCINTYRES RECHY, TOTAL DUMBOS-CANT BELIEVE IT- SEEMS THEIR FNY TALK EH-AND THAT’S IT OH AND STOP CHASING Me! Disg. RECHY LESBO TO MAKE IT SEEM Like Nothing ANYTHING FROM THAT GROTBAG-UGH RETURN WHAT IS MINE AND GAVINS -WE -am no reason then finally got me in Ayrshire on behalf on their whilte male disgusing usless chav for my money+abuse bodies-white state pervs, wrecking gavin + I marriage since bc we happy, on bhalf of their medics, Julia foster woodruff cadogan McIntyre Tory PR+that Ruth Davidson disgusting Nazi schav whore forcing me and non-whites friends to help’help’ her and her while males for a blonder/ fairer white amnesty international, getting ‘spedcial treatment’ demeaning others for r money,they looking to berascsit nazi practioners at Amnesty international Glasgow?!and since Holyrood/scotgov, while My lovely husband Gavin locked up four yrs we not even allowed to talk with plce +nhs staff threats attacks abuses ongoing when we get in touch or try to mcintyresabusing our marriage steaing from flat funds-all to force us ,abuse us to ‘believe’ in their stuuuupid ‘medicine’ lies! don’t think so- they don’t let ppl out until theuir take meds, ‘believe’ in meds, become dirty whore sluts through staff abuse in those places and tell staff where tyhey going for lifetime of stalkkig purposes! don’t think so-not this time, thety though 4 yrs aghosince I graduated MA in journalism and at work, they thought they coulsget into andwreck my life for their PR purposes-we don’t believe in treamtn nor meds- never mind what the pigs and nhs sent to the papers with maybe 100 media stories +illegal stolen id photos-house rannasaked many times illegal trespass alos illegal for them to publish our address and hand it over to plc so they can harass us-even london jan black medics worst lowlife disgusting scum-do anyhing to get ‘status’w whites-esp thta dr Ayriku Gavins prev black medic in ayrshire nadhis colleauge julius, totally wrecking our lives insults + they up Rechy’s arse Fergus monger menzies Campbell son, he’s even in Victoria Wood show, the ‘who me never guy’ eugh!yep exactement-Rechy total liar bribing them, prob took them to her bed knowing that slut-bc she cruel hates MY LOVELY husband-we cxant eaist until she dead meat but we have to be quick as we plannig children for yrs- peace when she gone-if spot her call sorn kirt for their excorcist, serioiusly,she evenlook like a dirty old haggis with that black + purple visage-in terms of health LIES-bc our rascists nazis whites media scumbag colleages +employers don’t want to pay what is owed+they dead inferior write about loos?! Riiight. They frauds don’t even deserve pay -up nhs+plce frauds ases-see the Herald Glasgow-oages of NHS adverts-refuse to pay ME for work commissioned/ even published! total propaganda time+money studies waster s’ from their Own Ancients Scots univs! Nazis-recycled ‘news’ bribed to put pieces in ‘news’ on how much they up the nhs + plc ‘behinds’-right! Total chavs, no decent person would want to work with these lowlives anyway-only one token female usu. in these white workplace-for their perverted scl harassment purposes-end of – OH+AS ILLITERTE SCUM CAN’T READ THE OLD ANGLAIS GET OED+GAVINS PROPER SALARY +STAFF INCL SUB.

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Results of search on: 22 Aug 2018 at 13:57:53. The details shown are valid at the date and time of the search only.
• GMC Reference Number
6128499
• Given Names
Daniel Richard
• Surname
Chandler
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Registered with a licence to practise; this doctor is on the Specialist Register

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• Primary Medical Qualification
MB ChB 2005 University of Glasgow

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31 Jul 2005
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01 Aug 2006
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Public health medicine From 22 Feb 2013
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Results of search on: 22 Aug 2018 at 14:12:04. The details shown are valid at the date and time of the search only.

GMC Reference Number
6128499
Given Names
Daniel Richard
Surname
Chandler
Gender
Man
Primary Medical Qualification
MB ChB 2005 University of Glasgow

Registration and licensing history since 20 October 2005

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To
Status
16 Nov 2009

Registered with a licence to practise
01 Aug 2006
16 Nov 2009
Registered
20 Oct 2005 (explain this)
01 Aug 2006
Provisionally registered

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Photos-Gavin-MY LOVELY HUSBAND @Gosforth, Newcastle-Nhs-)secretly from Morningside Royal Jan2017)w abusive staff+their plc networks-threats-dont think nhs staff filthy USERS ought to be chasing+ threatening+exploiting us like this-esp so called ‘patients’ family-ME! plc at our hs in jan bc phoned MY husband at hsptl-as is their wont :Gavin+I frightened of them after all these yrs of abuses + atacks-ME!+ journalist! SCARY CHAVS theives+frauds nazi scum/plc threats:Typical disg-chrstian whres teaching-forcing immorality! w abusing lives, funds+marriage since teens-State targets-NO reason:random; stalkers-attacks since teens-4 money, time, at work, while at univ-home, airport, bus stop…..take ANYTHING from us, esp valuables+personal items-even cat! We not safe in uk/eu/our children not safe from them either(bet they’d like them from us- to continue their abusive target lies eh?!Don’t think so)-Trtment LIES as their justification!?!+Trouble,brutality 4 opposing these abuses+stupid LIES+(wed be dead by now if we+(R ppl) hadn’t defended ourselves since teens+(Gavin + !haven’t got the strength anymore it seems, they take everything esp energy) they cant blame ‘suicides’ on ‘mental illness’ nonsense+lies!-More like forced murder!)McIntyre frauds buying protection from state w our lives+funds esp Julia Tory Holyrood pr, racsist bully+useless-but white+wealthy Cadogan+govt jobs for such nazi informer type scum+ w that idiote Rechy-if anyone takes issue with rules of journalism, obviously Gavin+I highly trained in how to report from white Nazi perspective-Don’t think SO – GET IT! AM NOT HELPING THEM-Stop asking forcing me to! THEY get in trouble no reason to go after me-Nazi uneducated white scum refuse to listen to me+Gavin either-Only int in OUR money so prefer dumbo whites’opinions’ only! ?! Total Neanderthals-they not even bothered if we starve-while they- see nhs staff above-get obese-As do Macintyres Mays, get high+fat-you should see them! Ugh

Adam Smith-Le Grande Tour-Fringe Preview *****Sam & Gavin Khan-McIntyre – Edinburgh Reporter

Title: Adam Smith, Le Grand Tour

Company: Compagnie Les Labyrinths (France)

Category: Theatre (14+) Institut français d’Ecosse

Dates: Aug. 3-11, 13-18, 20-26

Time: 3pm

Duration: 1 Hour

Tickets: £10

http://www.ifecosse.org.uk/

le grande tour 1

An intellectual and entertaining journey through the life and works of Adam Smith, explaining how his ideas on economics are incorporated into modern society, but in a distorted manner. The show is presented in multimedia form with two actors who interact with the big screen. The background film includes vox pops, which show how the founding father of economics and liberalism is unknown or misunderstood.

Senior economics lecturer and actor Vanessa Oltra plays Marie, a petite brunette,whose position as a senior economics lecturer and with PhD in the subject lends authenticity to the message of the play. Actor Frederic Kneip plays Fred with a rough charm as the couple journey through Scotland. The hushed audience of varying ages sit in the darkness silently, looking  very serious. They number around 50, with the theatre two-thirds full.

The show begins with cinema sized film spread across the whole stage beginning with a sombre cab ride to Canongate Kirkyard  in Edinburgh. Smith is buried here, and the actors are seen carrying a bouquet of white roses.

The actors appear centre stage dressed in camouflage from head to toe, as if ready to take on a battle. They are set against the film backdrop of a jungle.

As the play progresses, the scenes cut to the beautiful grandeur of the cloisters at Glasgow University, where Adam was Professor of Logic, and also to his statue on the Royal Mile, to the hustle and bustle of busy city streets where people are questioned on his philosophies, but know very little in comparison with his influence. In one scene, Fred plays the part of Smith himself, attired in a bright red floor-length silk gown with wide sleeves, and a white wig. He goes as far as to adopt a Scottish accent, in a comedic moment. However Marie who plays stage director asks him to tone it down, due to it causing confusion. She may be right as the Scottish accent coupled with his natural French one is a little odd.

Their aim is to educate the audience about what Adam Smith’s work actually meant, with citations and references to it. They contrast this to the way it is interpreted by the capitalist system and government to justify their actions in terms of economics.

Beginning the performance, Marie talking as if to Smith, and says: – “Do you know you are the founding father of economics, your invisible hand has crossed many continents…I want you to wake up now and tell us what you think of this. I warn you, economics is not to do with morals and philosophy any more…or human beings”.

Fred also discusses this same idea, attired as Smith. He talks about Smith’s attitude towards pleasure, passion and sympathy for others. He says melancholy comes from deprivation of a loved one, through death, which is a terrible situation and injustice for mankind. As a result “we sympathise for the feelings of others” and feel love. “We feel much for others and little for ourselves…mutual love and respect”.

le grande tour 2

Smith’s legacy is illustrated in the interview with the president of the Adam Smith Institute, which is a UK policy institute supporting the free market economy. The president is shown on film, the screen in two parts on each side of  Marie at centre stage.  He is facing away from her and sits passively. She speaks to him about the difficulties in establishing any link with Smith, and suggests his ideas were not just as simple as we may think.

The screen goes blank briefly and white noise appears as the signal is lost. She then asks the director if she can submit a citation from Smith, book 5, for the website, but the president shakes his head, even when she offers a substantial donation.

le grande tour 3

At the end, symbolising the real Adam Smith and his work, the play comes full circle as Marie and Fred, are seen at the cemetery, in order to pay homage and lay the white roses at his grand tombstone. They aim to obtain entrance through its iron gates, access to which proves to be restricted

The play is tightly directed by Gerard David, in a successful attempt to fit in important aspects of Smith and his legacy into one hour. It therefore moves at a fast pace. What could be perceived as dry and serious material is transformed into an entertaining, appealing and comedic hour incorporating the film footage.

Smith and his philosophies are therefore successfully and vividly brought to life.

Forthcoming Album by Edinburgh Youth Gaitherin’

Published in Edinburgh Reporter, June 1, 2013 by Sam Khan-McIntyre
link: https://www.theedinburghreporter.co.uk/2013/06/forthcoming-album-by-edinburgh-youth-gaitherin/

 

Padraig at the archives

Young musicians have been spending a year investigating and responding creatively to recordings and photos found in the School of Scottish Studies Archives at the University of Edinburgh. The seven participants are now raising money to record an album of the music they have developed.

This archive project is a collaboration between the School and Edinburgh Youth Gaitherin, and is supported by Creative Scotland. The aim is to inspire new people to use the Archives and break down barriers young people and the wider community might have with visiting or using them.

The School of Scottish Studies, established in 1951, houses a treasure trove of fieldwork recordings including traditional songs, music, folklore and stories. The resource is an important asset to Scottish heritage.

Cathlin Macaulay, Archives curator at the School of Scottish Studies said:-“We are keen to bring new users into the Archives, especially young people, and welcome the opportunity to collaborate with Edinburgh Youth Gaitherin.”

Whilst taking part in the project, the participants have been learning about what is involved in being musicians: developing skills such as writing music; playing in a group; teaching; promotion; recording and learning how distribution works. They have also been seeking to take an innovative approach to heritage, whilst also developing a meaningful understanding of the content of the Archives and the context of the recordings.

This approach has taken several diverse forms from creating big arrangements for younger musicians to play; writing songs inspired by anecdotes and recollections of the way people used to live; to experimenting with traditional singing styles and writing new versions of these using words from Gaelic stories.

padraig at the archives 2

Participant Paduig Morrison, 16, who studies at St Mary’s Music School in Edinburgh, and plays accordion and piano said:- “I have been playing a lot of traditional music and was very interested in learning lots of older stuff as well as newer stuff, and this project gave me the ability to access it”.

He added: “This project is inspiring as younger musicians understand where our music and traditional music comes from and [because] the oral tradition doesn’t exist to the same extent […] and it’s important as these were related to the songs of our forefathers”.

He believes the project is an excellent way of passing on the traditions. That through composing new material which is inspired by the old stories, melodies and recordings, ensures it evolves, keeps it and alive, and promotes an understanding of culture.

As traditional music is all about transmission, part of this project has involved transmitting music discovered in the Archives. This has been achieved by teaching it to younger musicians, EYG’s Big Band. The album being recorded will involve a track performed by the Big Band.

As part of the transmission process the participants have also been keeping a blog about what they have been doing. They hope their journey will inspire others.
The album is being recorded in collaboration with acclaimed musicians and producers Mike Vass and Matheu Watson. They still have money to raise in order to bring quality of recording to the album they feel it deserves. Therefore they have embarked upon a crowdfunding campaign, offering pre-orders of the album .

The album will be launched at the new arts complex at Summerhall on 29th September of this year. Tickets can be bought through their box office or online. Visit: http://www.summerhall.co.uk/2013/album-launch-the-archive-project/

Pedal on Parliament (Film broadcast)

POP2 once more

May 20, 2013 by  for Edinburgh Reporter Link:http://www.theedinburghreporter.co.uk/2013/05/pop2-once-more/

Another of our reporters was out on George IV Bridge and caught some of the action from Pedal on Parliament there on video… pedal on parliament movie from sam khan-mcintyre on Vimeo.

pedal on parliament movie from sam khan-mcintyre on Vimeo.

pedal on parliament picture

Tradfest: Songs of Peace and Protest: Hope’s Beautiful Daughters

May 9, 2013 by Sam Khan-McIntyre for Edinburgh Reporter

Link: http://www.theedinburghreporter.co.uk/category/culture/festivals/

 

Tradfest, the festival of traditional arts which finished at the weekend, put on a day of musical events based on campaigning and social justice as part of its programme which incorporated ‘Songs of Peace and Protest’, a singing workshop. They also staged a concert entitled ‘Hope’s Beautiful Daughters’ which celebrated music relating tales of struggle and peace.

Donald Smith, organiser of Tradfest, spoke to The Edinburgh Reporter about the festival’s sucess and its significance. We met him at Teviot Row House, part of Edinburgh University, in the imposing wood -panelled debating chamber.

Penny Stone, a singing tutor, ran the workshop. The two and a half hour long evening concert consisted of 6 sets of performers: Karine Polwart, Isla Ratcliffe, Katarina Juvancic with guitarist Dejan Lapanga, Brian Miller and Charlie Sloane and Star Band. The show was curated by Karine Polwart and Arthur Johnstone.

The singing workshop Songs of Peace and Protest was intimate and informal. Seven of us gathered round in a circle with Penny, who had picked the huge high-ceilinged chamber as the venue due to its excellent acoustics,  and soon it was filled with beautiful music. After the introductions, Penny started off with some stretching exercises to loosen the muscles, followed by much humming. She then got the group to warm up their vocals by joining in with a song, the different parts singing responses to her part. This she said represented a call and answer. The type of song was excellent during protests because you can get an answer out of people without them even knowing the lyrics. She then proceeded to teach the well-known song ‘We Shall Overcome.’ The anthem for the American civil rights movement in the 1960s, she explained, is still used today by different protest groups.  Penny taught the technique of harmonising through this piece, with different sections of the group taking the melody and the harmony. The group harmonising began with singing the harmony in one note, and then changing to another note.

Hopes Beautiful Daughters included songs of social and political intent. An audience of around 35 attended  the event in the Debating Hall at Teviot Row. Polwart explained that the intention was to make it feel like someone’s front room. Her beautiful voice with a strong Scots lilt took over the chamber with the first song ‘It’s Not What You’re Born With’.

This song expressed on the idea of making a difference to society through one’s talents. Her next song called ‘Better Things’ was written for a CND event, and discusses how the money that went to the Trident nuclear base could have been used for better things.

Most of the audience would not be described as young. Polwart explained that young people tend not to be actively political as the current generation is not as politicised as people once were.

However, the next musician on stage was 16- year old Isla Ratcliffe from Edinburgh Music School with her song ‘Death Row’. Isla, who wore a black T-shirt emblazoned with the words Troy Davis, has just won a national Amnesty International competition with the song. It is a moving account of death row inmate Troy Davis, who vehemently protested his innocence until the very last. The piece represents miscarriages within the justice system.

Third under the stage lights was Katarina Juvancic, a young alternative and folk artiste from Slovenia. With pixie-like looks, and a long black and white figure-hugging dress, she made an impact with her strong voice and powerful themes to her songs. These drew on various aspects of herself as well as on anthropology and collecting people’s stories.

She discussed the protest movement she is a part of in Slovenia, and how the artistic community rose to meet the challenge of the problems caused by economic crisis and injustices which resulted from it.  Juvancic performed five songs, some in Slovenian and others in English. Many of these were based on strong women’s voices.

She said: – “They are not heard enough and I want to empower these women, as well as myself, and I want the world to see them as empowered, because they’re struggling with hardships. Society sees them as victims but they’re not, they are survivors and I want to pay tribute to their courage.” She feels the role of activists is to ‘transform the pain of society into something beautiful’.

The festival was organised by Donald Smith who is also a director of the Storytelling Centre. When asked about the success of the festival, he said: – “I think it’s a good time because the weather is beginning to improve, and the old idea of Mayday and Beltane fits in with the performances in the open air. It’s not just a music festival. The idea was to involve all the arts inspired by tradition. The timing and variety of arts were the crucial difference from the festival’s predecessors, the Edinburgh Folk Festival and Ceilidhculture. People really like the variety and mix of things.”

On the festival’s significance, he said:- ”This is marvellous. It is all about the artistic values of being a community and supporting each other, and we need that now more than ever, the way the world is now. In traditional culture people celebrate community, humanity, and the wisdom in that. It is also politically important and we stand up as a community for the most victimised people.”

Smith concluded:- “Traditional arts aspire so that people are more fulfilled when they work together in a community, despite class divisions. They make everybody feel a part, and traditional culture celebrates song/society, and that is shared. There is a great sense of joy in the traditional arts, a celebration of life, the world and nature, compassion and friendliness. And we’re celebrating the beginning of spring.”

Tradfest: The Story of Scotland’s Creation

Cailleach's house. credit Catriona MurrayThe audience at this Tradfest event learned how Scotland came to be formed in the new telling of the 3,000 year old myth of the Cailleach, or old hag,  who, it is believed, created Scotland.  The storytellers brought the tale to life through wonderful narration, bright costumes and traditional music.

Taking place at the Storytelling Centre, the myth was narrated by Janis McKay and David Campbell. The hour-long performance was accompanied by renowned traditional Scottish musician Allan MacDonald.   The performers’ aim is for the story to become part of the ‘yes’ campaign on Scottish Independence. Their inspiration came from the Finnish Creation Myth, Kalevala, which helped Finland’s  independence from  Russia .

Janis McKay took centre stage looking dramatic in a flowing floor length turquoise gown, embroidered with Celtic designs. After an introduction to the evening, she explained how the story was put together through research and with guidance from Campbell. He was fittingly resplendent in traditional highland costume, complete with a bright yellow shirt and red necktie, costumes which set the atmosphere for the night’s theme. Campbell narrated the story alongside Mackay, also taking the part of the male role of the young prince.

She then introduced MacDonald, describing him as a “wonderful musician”, to which he replied “And she’s an awful woman!” to roars of laughter from the audience made up of people of all ages and cultures, and with the theatre full to capacity.

The stage was now set for a light-hearted and entertaining evening, as the audience settled down in expectation, and the lights dimmed. In fact, MacDonald, from his place at the side of the stage, did indeed transpire to be a wonderful musician, evoking a sense of Scotland’s natural beauty. Painting a picture of the mist over the mountains and scenic lochs through several traditional instruments. These included the smallpipes, Jew’s harp and malodoan, with Campbell weaving music into the storytelling with an obvious talent and skill.

MacKay began the narration of the tale by explaining how the story of the hag Cailleach unfolded. We learned how she had been living and working in Finland, when she came across the work of Elias Lonnrot, who had gathered and wrote a creation myth for the country in the 19th Century. She said:- ”While I was there I asked what is the Scottish original myth?” She then started to do research into  this, and explained:-  “I was guided by David Campbell, and we found this Earth Cailleach figure. What you will hear has been rescued from many tales, but the words are our own.”

She also completed the story’s setting for us, about a place called Glen Lyon in Perthshire, which is very isolated from anywhere. Here , she said: – “The Cailleach’s little house, about four feet tall, still stands”. Campbell explained that this was where the shrine to the Caillieach (meaning old woman in Gaelic) is maintained. This has been taken outside the house and left to stand in the air for the summer until the arrival of winter, or Samhain.

She said this is  a “tribute to the goddess,” and the “longest continuing ritual in Europe” from ancient times. Until very recently, it was carried out by a shepherd, and is now carried out by the local historical society.

We were then transported into another world  as the story progressed over the next forty- five minutes, with a genuinely infectious  sincerity and passion. This enabled the suspension of disbelief and a childlike entry into the magical world of gods and goddesses, princes, hags and strange creatures and beautiful beings.

The theme, as in the billed title, was creation. The tale of how Scotland emerged from a wasteland where there was once nothing, when the Callieach, described as “the mother goddess and creation of this land” came into being. She made “the first and ancient rock of her beloved Caledonia” which was claimed to be Iona. The story documents how she created each aspect of the country, the islands when “she gathered peats and carried them on a creel on her back. She fell, and the clods scattered, creating the islands”, mountains, the lakes and streams, were also made.

Described as “the hag of winter”, she was not ready to lose her grip on the land, when one night her alter ego, Bride, the goddess of spring, came into existence, through a dreamlike vision.  Bride threatened to uproot the Cailleach’s cold supremacy her with her youthful beauty.

For Bride, flowers and grass grow everywhere she walks.  The Cailleach becomes inflamed, and therefore dresses her in rags, enslaves, then imprisons her, “but her beauty never fades”. Angus Og, the prince of the eternally youthful and green land of Tir Na Nog, sees what is happening in a dream and sets off towards Bride.

The Cailleach then washed her plaid, and to dry it out, threw it over the mountaintops, coating the land in ice and darkness.  She sees a beautiful young face in her well, perhaps a younger version of herself. The prince soon arrives, and a battle ensues. He tells her:- “Begone, begone, your time has come”, portraying the eternal struggle between life and death.

The Cailleach had no intention of growing old gracefully, but is finally defeated and driven away to her isle in the west.  She eventually comes to realise what she has become, when she speaks to the tide about “how she is no longer mighty.”

The story ends when Bride then “took the outstretched hand of Angus and walked into the living Earth”, and flowers grew behind their footsteps.

With regard to the ‘yes’ campaign,  Campbell spoke to The Edinburgh Reporter explaining the nationalist aim for the story.  He explained:-  “The Finnish story was part of the thing which galvanised the sense of belonging, that traditional independence lives in the heart and spirit of the people.”

He continued:- “We aim to support the ‘yes’ campaign where we can through performances for example at the Edinburgh Fringe. The tale spreads a sense of the legend and story of people, and if people get that strong feeling, then that belongs to our destiny.”

“You can gather people’s support in elections or “win by poetry” as its beautiful sense speaks to the heart, spirit and imagination, but once the support is there, you rule by prose.”

For more information, visit:

http://www.daviddcampbell.co.uk/about-me.htm

http://www.janismackay.com/about-me/

Photos courtesy of Mike Wilkinson and Catriona Murray

Tradfest: Lore of the Land

Sam Khan-McIntyre published in Edinburgh Reporter on April 30 2013.

Link: http://www.theedinburghreporter.co.uk/2013/04/tradfest-lore-of-the-land/

Folklore Tapes Night. Rob St _JohnA night of folk music with a modern interpretation, as well as a talk on field recordings was brought together by Folklore Tapes. This is an ongoing project of documentation and collaboration of experimental audio and visual responses to different themes within folklore.

As part of Tradfest, the festival of traditional arts currently taking place, this event was held at the Scottish Storytelling Centre. Tom Western, a PhD student on field recording in Post-war Britain, began proceedings with a presentation to a full auditorium of 99, mainly young people.

Three diverse folk music acts followed the talk. First on stage were Ian Humberstone and Malcolm Benzie, with an intriguing tale set to modern and traditional instruments.   Iona Magnetic were next on stage, mixing folk stories with electronic music techniques and improvisation. Finally, the evening ended with Rob St. John, originating from Lancashire, with his band incorporating a more classical set up.

As the lights dimmed, and the audience hushed in expectation, Western took the stage and began with a 30 minute presentation on the authenticity of this type of field audio. Such recordings are produced outside a studio, and can feature natural sounds, or musicians and storytellers in their own surroundings. These began as an aid to research work,  and then used for documentary purposes.

Western first attempted to define the folk genre, when he said:-  “It’s hard to define but the borders between folk and pop music are seen as being opposites. Folk music has dealt with technology by embracing it and its effects.”

Western focused on the process of folk recording as “models of authenticity”, and related the difference between true and false recordings, and the way field recordings are placed in this context. He also explored the supposed authenticity of recordings since the Second World War, particularly  whether technology really adds legitimacy. Western explored the media’s role, and its commercial aims. He explained:- ”These are relevant issues because reproduction and recreation of the recordings contribute to the corruption of authenticity. This can also lead to distortion and fragmentation of the original sound.”

Ian Humberstone and Malcolm Benzie were next to appear, with the tale of esteemed witch, Mariann Voaden, who in the  late 19th century offered magical remedies, predictions  and fixing of curses. Mariann lived in a derelict house in Bratton, Devon, until it eventually fell apart and burned down. The house’s decay, and the effects of this on Mariann were themes in the music.

The traditional instrument, the harmonium, lent a core authenticity to the thirty minute piece, while adding a new interpretation due to the inclusion of the modern instruments, the violin and cymbals. These all combined to create an eerie and atmospheric sound, with a sinister and dark, slow deep haunting melody.  We could imagine Mariann deep in the dark woods in that house which is creaking and groaning with a life of its own.

Iona Magnetic, a band comprising David Orphan from Iona along with Alexander Borland had only decided to play the festival two weeks ago, and despite only one rehearsal of their 30-minute set under their belt, despite which their sound was still very professional.

Their first tale was called “The Fishermen and the Fairy Mound”. This folk tale is of two fishermen coming home in bad weather when they encounter the fairy queen going past Sithean Beg (the little fairy mound). She beguiles one of them and takes him away. His friend pleads every night with the fairies for his release, until finally a year later the queen consents to the fisherman’s return in exchange for his catch as ransom.

The band incorporated old and new instruments, cassettes, abstract films and field recordings in the local tongue to create a whole multimedia experience.  The backdrop film was an abstract in black and white. The 8mm film had been left in water to coat it in algae, which created an interesting effect and was played in vintage mode.

The cracking and hiss in the film’s audio indicated traditional materials and old recordings. The field recordings from Iona of wind and waves crashing, signified the fisherman’s doom, but the birdsong allowed us some hope. These also added authenticity to the piece and created an effect of the tale’s otherworldliness.

The ukulele as well as manipulated cassette players, mixed traditional and modern, bringing the piece into the present and indicating the evolution of folklore.

The darkness of harmony and broken melody were hypnotising in the dark auditorium, leading us to believe in the fairy queen and her beguiling. The slow tempo included sudden crashes and bangs, but the ukulele melody provided lightness towards the end as the danger decreased as the fisherman was rescued from the other world and returned home to the sound of the xylophone.

The second tale was about Netta Fornario. Netta went to Iona in 1929 with the intention of living there, and also further her occult studies as member of the group Alpha and Omega. This was part of the Order of the Golden Dawn, who were involved in astral projections and who performed magical rituals in the woods. Netta was found dead in these woods in dubious circumstances, perhaps as part of a ritual. She was discovered on top of a large cross carved in to the ground, along with a dagger and a blackened cross, which Western explained as “all very strange and arcane”.

The background film of decay contributed to the dark and sinister atmosphere. It was made on Super 8 film coated in dead insects and incorporated field recordings of a voice telling the story in tongues, as if from the past.

The incessant instrumental beat signified Netta’s heartbeat, and the twanging ukulele signified her move to the Scotland that she loved. The field recordings of wind and waves crashing show her doom, as the music became eerie and dangerous. It was as if Netta was running, scared. The music speeding up, with bangs, and the screen turning red, signified her death on the cross. It ended with a sinister recorded voice talking of how she was found.

When asked about his inspiration for the piece, Orphan said: – “I guess because The Fisherman and the Fairy Mound is a local story that I can relate to, as that was where I walked past a lot and the menfolk raced horses around it on a midsummer eve. It was a leftover from a pagan tradition. The piece is not done in a uniform way. The soundtrack is done in our way, keeping the same thing alive, but differently.”

Rob St. John with his band were the final headlining act, his set included the release of his new 7″ single Charcoal Black, with the b- sides The Bonny Grey/ Shallow Brown. Charcoal Black is a traditional Lancastrian melody from 1905, about the Industrial Revolution and crumbling mill towns contrasted with green fields. This is a ballad sung with energy and conviction, with the vocalist adding to the drama with his impressive stage presence and energy which made the music come to life.

“Shallow Brown” is a sad, haunting piece about the death of a loved one, Juliana; is a West Indian sea shanty from 1908; and an affiliation to slave ships on the port of Sunderland Point in Lancashire in the 1700s. The band has a modern set-up, with an electric guitar,  the moog and drums accompanying traditional folk songs. St. John said: – “I feel we’re on an exciting learning curve, with brand new songs recorded last year. These are traditional songs but reinterpreted. This is a wonderful space, brilliant sound and lovely people, I can’t ask for much more.” Judging by the applause at the end, they did themselves and the venue justice.

The event was part of Tradfest, a festival of traditional Scottish arts. This runs in Edinburgh between 24 April to 6 May at various venues. It is part of the celebrations for Mayday or Beltane, the traditional start of summer. The festival encompasses music, song, storytelling, dance, crafts, folk drama and celebrations of the environment. The festival is based on previous festivals such as the Edinburgh People’s Festival and the International Folk Festival.  Events included are to suit all tastes, including families and children.